Accenture: Hospitals Engaging Just 2 Percent of Patients via Mobile Apps

Mobile_Health_Apps_highresNew research from Accenture reveals that just 2 percent of patients in the largest U.S. hospitals are currently using hospital-provided mobile health apps.

Accenture estimates that failure to align mobile apps to the services consumers’ demand could cost each of these hospitals, on average, more than $100 million in lost annual revenue, a report summary shared with MHW reads.

The research, which assessed mobile app use among the 100 largest U.S. hospitals, found that two-thirds (66 percent) of the 100 largest U.S. hospitals have mobile apps for consumers and roughly two-fifths (38 percent) of that subset have developed proprietary apps for their patients. However, only 11 percent of health systems offer patients proprietary apps that operate with at least one of the three functions that consumers demand most: access to medical records; the ability to book, change and cancel appointments; and the ability to request prescription refills electronically.

“Simply having a mobile app is not enough,” said Brian Kalis, managing director in Accenture’s Health practice. “Hospital apps are failing to engage patients by not aligning their functionality and user experience with what consumers expect and need. Consumers want ubiquitous access to products and services as part of their customer experience, and those who become disillusioned with a provider’s mobile services – or a lack thereof – could look elsewhere for services.”

According to Kalis, mobile engagement “is becoming increasingly critical to the success of every hospital in the digital age.”

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