Continua Encourages Student Design with Free Access to Guidelines

Continua Encourages Student Design with Free Access to Guidelines   Low Power Radio Profiles interoperability GSMA end to end system Continua Health Alliance 2011 Design Guidelines Continua Health Alliance has announced that its 2011 Public Design Guidelines will be free to university students.

The Continua Health Alliance, an international not-for-profit healthcare and technology alliance, has chosen to take this step as a way of demonstrating its support for the 2011-2012 GSMA Mobile Health University Challenge.

The GSMA challenge is designed to draw university students worldwide into focusing on developing either an mHealth business concept or technology that focuses on solving a specific issue in healthcare today. Additionally, Jeanine Vos, the head of GSMA’s mobile health unit has surmised, “Having access to Continua’s Guidelines will allow this year’s University Challenge participants the opportunity to accelerate their application development because they will be able to rapidly integrate a wide variety of Continua-compliant health and medical devices.”

The Continua Design Guidelines, which dictate industry, service, communication, and device standards in an effort to promote interoperability, are expected to aid students as they build secure end-to-end systems. The guidelines will allow them to utilize better sensor connectivity between the hubs and mobile devices, and the Low Power Radio Profiles, designed collaboratively with Continua, enable the university students to connect a larger quantity of devices with little additional effort.

Thus, Continua’s contribution is just another step in the apparent industry-wide push to include university students in the mHealth development process. This move toward young developers is explained by Clint McClellan, Continua’s Board President and Senior Director of Business Development for Qualcomm, Inc. He stated that Continua is interested in supporting the University Challenge because “collaboration between industry and academia helps drive innovation,” adding, “Involving academic institutions, and their students who will become talented developers and entrepreneurs, in the development process, is a vital step toward fostering and enhancing the global ecosystem of personal connected healthcare.”

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