REACH Health: Enterprise Telemedicine Deployments on the Rise in U.S. Hospitals

As the telemedicine industry “matures,” U.S. hospitals are increasingly using an enterprise approach.

That’s according to the results from the REACH Health 2017 U.S. Telemedicine Industry Benchmark Survey.

We’re told that forty percent of hospital respondents indicated their telemedicine initiatives are centrally managed (enterprise approach), and almost half of the others that began with a departmental approach are now transitioning to an enterprise model.

“Last year, we observed significant increases in the number of telemedicine service lines being implemented in U.S. hospitals, and this year’s survey confirmed the shift to the use of enterprise telemedicine platforms,” said Steve McGraw, President and CEO of REACH Health.

The move to enterprise telemedicine is also reflected in additional survey findings. Survey respondents identified telemedicine platform features that are most valuable to their organizations. Three of the top six platform features are related to telemedicine data and analytics: clinical documentation, ability to send documentation to/from the EMR, and ability to analyze consult data. All of these were rated as critical or valuable by nearly 80% of respondents.

“We saw a high degree of value placed on platform features related to data and analytics, EMR integration and support for off-the-shelf endpoints such as laptops and tablets.  These features and capabilities tend to have a greater impact on the organization as a whole more than individual departments because they are integral to maximizing the value of investments in equipment and software,” said McGraw. “Conversely, features that tend to have more of an impact on individual departments, such as support for proprietary devices, are less frequently noted as critical or valuable.”

Complimentary copies of the full survey report may be downloaded here.

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