Secure Text Messaging Could Save Hospitals a Fortune Annually

Secure Text Messaging Could Save Hospitals a Fortune Annually   text sms secure text messaging mobile Imprivata Communications in Healthcare For hospitals, there’s huge savings to be secured in secure SMS.

Late last week, mHealthWatch was briefed on a new study that Imprivata recently published about the productivity and economic impact that inefficient provider-to-provider communication has in healthcare.

“Inefficient communication during critical clinical workflows such as patient admissions, emergency response team coordination and patient transfers costs the average U.S. hospital about $1.75 million annually,” reads the report summary shared.
Titled “The Imprivata Report on the Economic Impact of Inefficient Communications in Healthcare,” the report finds that a significant amount of time is wasted during these workflows—primarily due to the inefficiency of pagers and the lack of adoption of secure text messaging.

Additionally, the report finds that the use of secure text messaging could reclaim more than half of this wasted time, and minimize the economic loss.

“Efficient communication and collaboration amongst providers is critical to the coordination and delivery of patient care, especially within an ACO where quality is impacted in part by the promptness of care delivery,” said Dr. Thomas Kloos, executive director for the Atlantic Management Service Organization.

“The results of the Imprivata and Ponemon study highlight the pressing need for more effective communications solutions, which we’ve addressed at Atlantic Health System with Imprivata Cortext,” adds Dr. Kloos. “This gives our providers a robust tool for increasing communications efficiency across our entire ACO network, which improves provider productivity, reduces unnecessary patient readmissions, increases clinical integration within the ACO and most importantly, allows patients to more quickly receive the care they require.”

The Imprivata Report on the Economic Impact of Inefficient Communications in Healthcare is available here.

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