FDA Publishes Final Guidance on Mobile Medical Apps

FDA Publishes Final Guidance on Mobile Medical Apps   Mobile Apps mHealth FDA Final Guidance on Mobile Medical Apps FDA On Monday, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued its long awaited final guidance for developers of mobile medical applications.

As expected, the guidance outlines the FDA’s tailored approach to mobile apps.

The agency intends to exercise enforcement discretion (meaning it will not enforce requirements under the Federal Drug & Cosmetic Act) for the majority of mobile apps as they pose minimal risk to consumers.

The FDA, however, says it also intends to focus its regulatory oversight on a subset of mobile medical apps that present a greater risk to patients if they do not work as intended.

“Some mobile apps carry minimal risks to consumer or patients, but others can carry significant risks if they do not operate correctly. The FDA’s tailored policy protects patients while encouraging innovation,” says Jeffrey Shuren, M.D., J.D., director of the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health.

The FDA is focusing its oversight on mobile medical apps that:

  • are intended to be used as an accessory to a regulated medical device – for example, an application that allows a health care professional to make a specific diagnosis by viewing a medical image from a picture archiving and communication system (PACS) on a smartphone or a mobile tablet; or
  • transform a mobile platform into a regulated medical device – for example, an application that turns a smartphone into an electrocardiography (ECG) machine to detect abnormal heart rhythms or determine if a patient is experiencing a heart attack.

Mobile medical apps that undergo FDA review will be assessed using the same regulatory standards and risk-based approach that the agency applies to other medical devices.

As a reminder, the agency does not regulate the sale or general consumer use of smartphones or tablets nor does it regulate mobile app distributors such as the ‘iTunes App store” or the “Google Play store.”

To date, the agency has cleared approximately 100 mobile medical applications in the last ten years, 40% of which were sanctioned in just the last two years.

To review the final guidance published today, click here.

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